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Atlas Air 763F Down On Approach To IAH

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JLAmber (netAirspace ATC & Founding Member) 23 Feb 19, 20:30Post
Atlas Air 763F N1217A operating 5Y3591 MIA - IAH for Amazon Prime Air lost radio contact at around 1300 ft while over Trinity Bay on approach to IAH . Very early reports suggest there are three crew onboard.

https://abc13.com/crews-responding-to-c ... y/5153229/

https://www.flightradar24.com/data/airc ... a#1f98a1ae

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NCoats737 23 Feb 19, 20:59Post
Not Good... Debris Field from live chopper looks like there's nothing left, small debris littered everywhere in the water.
Beat it to fit, paint it to match.
Queso (netAirspace ATC Tower Chief & Founding Member) 23 Feb 19, 21:56Post
Confirmed, no survivors.

https://www.click2houston.com/news/boei ... d-faa-says
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Queso (netAirspace ATC Tower Chief & Founding Member) 23 Feb 19, 22:02Post
Whatever happened happened fast, last two ADSB position reports show a descent rate of 4,750 FPM then 7,000 FPM respectively.

https://flightaware.com/live/flight/GTI ... H/tracklog
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Queso (netAirspace ATC Tower Chief & Founding Member) 23 Feb 19, 23:41Post
ATC audio, nothing unusual (GIANT 3591), but there were storms in the area at the time. First unanswered call from ATC is at 9:30, then a query if someone hears an ELT:

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GQfluffy (Database Editor & Founding Member) 24 Feb 19, 00:13Post
She fell out of the sky rapidly. Poor buggers.
Teller of no, fixer of everything, friend of the unimportant and all around good guy; the CAD Monkey
extender 13 Mar 19, 12:04Post
March 12 update from NTSB. Things don't look good.

https://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/pag ... ma086.aspx

"Air traffic control communications and radar data indicated the flight was normal from Miami to the Houston terminal area. About 12:30 pm the pilots contacted the Houston terminal radar approach control (TRACON) arrival controller and reported descending for runway 26L; the airplane was at 17,800 ft with a ground speed 320 knots.

At 12:34, the airplane was descending through 13,800 ft, and the controller advised of an area of light to heavy precipitation along the flight route and that they could expect vectors around the weather. (See figure 2.)

About 12:35, the flight was transferred to the Houston TRACON final controller, and the pilot reported they had received the Houston Automatic Terminal Information System weather broadcast. The controller told the pilots to expect vectors to runway 26L and asked if they wanted to go to the west or north of the weather.

Radar data indicated the airplane continued the descent through 12,000 ft with a ground speed of 290 knots, consistent with the arrival procedure. The pilots responded that they wanted to go to the west of the area of precipitation. The controller advised that to do so, they would need to descend to 3,000 ft expeditiously.

About 12:37, the controller instructed the pilots to turn to a heading of 270°. Radar data indicated the airplane turned, and the automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) data indicated a selected heading of 270°. The airplane was descending through 8,500 ft at this time (figure 3).

About 12:38, the controller informed the pilots that they would be past the area of weather in about 18 miles, that they could expect a turn to the north for a base leg to the approach to runway 26L, and that weather was clear west of the precipitation area. The pilots responded, “sounds good” and “ok.” At this time, radar and ADS-B returns indicated the airplane levelled briefly at 6,200 ft and then began a slight climb to 6,300 ft.

Also, about this time, the FDR data indicated that some small vertical accelerations consistent with the airplane entering turbulence. Shortly after, when the airplane’s indicated airspeed was steady about 230 knots, the engines increased to maximum thrust, and the airplane pitch increased to about 4° nose up. The airplane then pitched nose down over the next 18 seconds to about 49° in response to nose-down elevator deflection. The stall warning (stick shaker) did not activate.

FDR, radar, and ADS-B data indicated that the airplane entered a rapid descent on a heading of 270°, reaching an airspeed of about 430 knots. A security camera video (figure 4) captured the airplane in a steep, generally wings-level attitude until impact with the swamp. FDR data indicated that the airplane gradually pitched up to about 20 degrees nose down during the descent.

The airplane was manufactured in 1992 as a Boeing 767-375 in a passenger configuration and was equipped with GE CF-6 engines. It was converted to a freighter configuration in 2017. Maintenance records showed the airplane had 91,063 hours and 23,316 cycles at the time of the accident. There were no outstanding airworthiness directives or inoperative items.

Company records indicated that the captain was qualified and current in the airplane and held an FAA airline transport pilot certificate with type ratings for the B757/767 and EMB145. He had a current FAA first class medical certificate with a limitation for corrective lenses. He had worked for Atlas Air since September 2015 and had about 11,000 hours total flight experience with about 1,250 hours of experience in the Boeing 767.

The first officer was qualified and current in the airplane and held an FAA airline transport pilot certificate with type ratings for the B757/767, EMB145, and EMB170/190. He had a current FAA first class medical certificate with a limitation for glasses for near vision. He had worked for Atlas Air since July 2017 and had about 5,000 hours total flight experience with about 520 hours of experience in the Boeing 767.

A cockpit voice recorder (CVR) group was convened and will complete a transcript of the entire event. The CVR transcript will be released when the public docket is opened. Other groups include operations/human factors, ATC, weather, structures, systems, powerplants, and maintenance records. Further groups may be formed as the investigation progresses."
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 13 Mar 19, 13:29Post
The airplane then pitched nose down over the next 18 seconds to about 49° in response to nose-down elevator deflection. The stall warning (stick shaker) did not activate.

I'm calling it: Clearly MCAS. Ground them all. {mischief}
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
Zak (netAirspace FAA) 13 Mar 19, 13:56Post
By how I read this, there are no signs pointing towards an inflight breakup. The absence of a stick shaker warning also indicates they did not stall the aircraft.

Pure guesswork ahead - the most likely scenario to me seems that improperly secured cargo started shifting in the hold when they hit turbulence.

Other possible causes - microburst, faulty sensors leading to wrong flight parameters, or an intentional crash caused by the PF - guess they all seem possible, but not necessarily likely.
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extender 13 Mar 19, 14:09Post
Multiple possible causes, but why was full power applied right before the nose dove.

CVR transcript will be crucial.
Zak (netAirspace FAA) 13 Mar 19, 14:21Post
extender wrote:Multiple possible causes, but why was full power applied right before the nose dove.

I'm not a pilot, but if the aircraft suddenly starts acting weird, I guess you would want full power to be available, in order to have a chance to resolve the situation.

Of course, the same would apply if you decide to ram the thing straight into the ground.

CVR will indeed be the key. Question is, will it be a "okay, here's what I'm going to do" kind of transcript, or rather a "what the hell is going on here?" one.
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Lucas (netAirspace ATC & Founding Member) 13 Mar 19, 18:45Post
Interesting that they changed the reading from "due to control column input" to what it is now.
CO777ER (Database Editor & Founding Member) 14 Mar 19, 02:49Post
ShyFlyer (Founding Member) 14 Mar 19, 03:37Post
Zak wrote:I'm not a pilot, but if the aircraft suddenly starts acting weird, I guess you would want full power to be available...


Not necessarily. Just because the aircraft "starts acting weird" doesn't mean full power is automatically applied. There are certain situations that call for full power, but it's not a "when in doubt, balls to the wall" type of thing.
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GQfluffy (Database Editor & Founding Member) 14 Mar 19, 16:34Post
Ooof.

Poor buggers. Really does make one wonder if the cargo broke free...
Teller of no, fixer of everything, friend of the unimportant and all around good guy; the CAD Monkey
miamiair (netAirspace FAA) 14 Mar 19, 17:23Post
GQfluffy wrote:Ooof.

Poor buggers. Really does make one wonder if the cargo broke free...


Cargo breaking free isn't going to push the power levers to max power...
And let's get one thing straight. There's a big difference between a pilot and an aviator. One is a technician; the other is an artist in love with flight. — E. B. Jeppesen
vikkyvik 14 Mar 19, 17:47Post
GQfluffy wrote:Ooof.

Poor buggers. Really does make one wonder if the cargo broke free...


Yeah....reminds me of the video of that cargo 747 that crashed after takeoff from Bagram, I think.
JLAmber (netAirspace ATC & Founding Member) 14 Mar 19, 21:30Post
vikkyvik wrote:
GQfluffy wrote:Ooof.

Poor buggers. Really does make one wonder if the cargo broke free...


Yeah....reminds me of the video of that cargo 747 that crashed after takeoff from Bagram, I think.


National 744F N949CA at Bagram, experienced catastrophic load shift. As in this case it also looked like the pilots were trying to get the nose up right until the end.
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