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It's Official: A380 Production To End

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ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 14 Feb 19, 06:55Post
Airbus is to close its A380 programme, stopping deliveries in 2021, ending an ambitious and expensive bid to challenge Boeing’s 50-year dominance in the high-capacity airliner market.

The decision follows a revised agreement with primary customer Emirates, which is to cut its order total from 162 to 123 aircraft – leaving just 14 to be handed over to the Dubai-based carrier.

“As a consequence and given the lack of order backlog with other airlines, Airbus will cease deliveries of the A380 in 2021,” says the airframer.

Read more: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... re-455756/

Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.

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ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 14 Feb 19, 06:57Post
Outgoing Airbus chief executive Tom Enders describes as “painful” the decision to close the A380 programme, maintaining that the double-deck type remains an “outstanding” achievement.

The airframer puts the cost of axing the A380 at €463 million, the company has disclosed in its full-year financial results.

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... rs-455760/
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
JLAmber (netAirspace ATC & Founding Member) 14 Feb 19, 23:10Post
The situation has been an open secret for some time now. To operate the vastly expensive and complex logistics & assembly network required a minimum level of throughput just to keep the line viable on a day-to-day basis, never mind in the long term, and the orders simply aren't there. The appetite for VLJs has all but disappeared at a time when the success of the A350 together with the continuing growth of the A32x lines has meant a huge sideways step for the Airbus staff whose job it is to keep each project working at maximum efficiency, meaning the A380 line has been operating with a 'finish up, get the job done' mentality for some time.

Sad that the last of the dream big aircraft has to end like this but there simply was no life left in the A380, or any other VLJ.
A million great ideas...
Fumanchewd 20 Feb 19, 06:32Post
As an economy passenger I didn't think the aircraft was great, but I saw that if you can afford business or higher it must have been a great experience. As an aviation enthusiast it wasn't pretty, but it was impressive. Watching one taxi by or take off was to acknowledge the power of engineering and human progress. I was pretty neutral overall on the aircraft, didn't think it was horrible, didn't have any awesome experiences with it.

Thinking back to those hundreds of A380 back and forth threads where any criticism of the 380 program was seen as just being pro B and later contributors would state with fact that "The program will certainly be successful and run for decades to come". I was never involved in them other than a few quick commentaries, but it turns out that Airbus simply made the wrong financial decision. I think its worth taking note that this is a great example that any aircraft program can be criticized without any regard to whether it is a good aircraft or not. The A380 was a good aircraft but the decision making process should have been rightfully criticized from the start.

Curious to know how much the program will end up losing Airbus and the contributing countries involved. The twins now reign!
You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows.
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 20 Feb 19, 07:57Post
Fumanchewd wrote:I think its worth taking note that this is a great example that any aircraft program can be criticized without any regard to whether it is a good aircraft or not.

Good point. I wonder how different things might have been without the CATIA debacle and the resulting delays and A380F cancellation.
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
tangoscar 21 Feb 19, 15:45Post
Although the program itself isn't a commercial success story, but taking on the challenge to design and build the A380 helped Airbus in the long run, because it drove innovation, added to lessons learned and cemented its objective to become a counterbalance on par with Boeing.

Often the outcome isn't quantifiable and measurable, but often only making mistakes will lead to innovation and to becoming better and eventually successful. The result of going through this process on the A380 (and the A400M) is the A350, which apparently is en route to become a success story.

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